Traditional Tresterfleisch from Mosel. Pork marinated in wine lees.

Mosel (formerly Mosel-Saar-Ruwer, before the PR face-lift) is one of Germany’s thirteen Qualitatswine regions. Famed for its dangerously steep sixty-five-degree vineyard slopes and equally breathtaking Riesling. Pinot Noir, which here goes by Spätburgunder, has had a steady increase in popularity over recent years.

Cool continental climate and well-drained slate soils present excellent conditions for grape growth set against a reflective basin of the Mosel river. Wines are often low in alcohol, high in acidity and expressive of fruit and aroma.

Here, in this unique land, a curious delicacy of pork marinated in lees often pops up on dinner tables. Lees is the sedimented product in fermentation. A combination of dead yeast, grape seeds or stem, pulp and tartrates. White wine matured in fine lees develop complex aromas and flavor with balanced tannins. In its place locals will use Riesling.

Note: When cooking with wine, always use good quality wine so that when it reduces, the flavorful good characters can be appreciated in the dish. Serving the same wine is also a plus!

Its origin

Back when pomace brandy (Grappa) was fired, winemakers were allowed to hang a pot of seasoned meat in the boiler resulting in the dish. Without the use of a pit one can recreate the dish by marinating the meat in wine suds tied in with a brew of spices and rested for three to five days. Later pop into the oven at a good 180 degrees and cook for two hours.

Season with a sweet and sour broth of wine and sugar. Serve with some toasted bread and, of course, Riesling.

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